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Leather lexicon

Everything you ever wanted to know about leather

There are many types of leather. They are produced in different ways, differ in appearance and texture, and have different requirements in terms of cleaning and care.

Familiarise yourself with the different types of leather and their special features. What is the difference between smooth and napped leather? What is nubuck? And how do you actually care for patent leather? You can find out in our leather glossary. Would you like to know more about the special features of the leather used by Liebeskind Berlin? The leather glossary will help you here too: Flat Grain, Waxy Vacchetta and Metallic Heavy Pebbles – you can read exactly what lies behind these terms in our glossary.

Smooth leather

Smooth leather is made of the uppermost layer of the leather, known as the grain split. Unlike napped leather, it is finished with the hair side facing outwards. Even if leather types finished on the grain side are generally referred to as smooth leather, the surface texture varies. It depends on the grain texture of the respective animal. Calfskin, for example, has a very flat grain, while sheepskin has a more pronounced grain.

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Napped leather

The generic term napped leather refers to different types of leather. Their common characteristic is the velvety surface, which has a pleasantly soft finish and a beautiful texture. There are two types of napped leather: nubuck and suede leather

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Patent leather

Patent leather is a grain-free leather with a high-shine surface. It is firm and shape-retaining with minimal stretch. Patent leather is mainly used for shoes and bags, but also for other small leather goods. This characteristic look can be created using two methods.

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Lambskin

Lambskin comes from young sheep and is usually a by-product of meat production. Whether the term “lamb” may be used depends on the age of the animal. In general, sheep younger than one year are called lambs – even if they are already full-grown. The distinction between sheepskin and lambskin is based solely on age, not the stage of growth.

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Laminated leather

Laminated leather has a metallic look and is therefore also known as metallic leather. This extraordinary effect is created using a special surface finish. Wafer-thin layers of metal foil are applied to the grain side of the leather. This creates the characteristic look reminiscent of polished metal.

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